Shooting in the Breeze

They say March comes in like a lion and leaves like a lamb, which must create a considerable vacuum considering how windy it gets. But it makes for great (and challenging) photo ops.

Everything that blows and flows gets more blowy and flowy: elegant dresses, long hair, flowers, flags, waves, and clouds to name but a few. Here are some things to keep in mind to make the most of it.

Protect your property (and yourself)

If you’re going to be somewhere sandy or watery, be sure to keep your camera in the bag until you’re ready to shoot. Consider using a rain cover. And watch out for flying debris and narrow ledges. We’re all just one gust away from the emergency room.

Adjust your settings

woman with wind blown hair

Photo by Dev Asangbam from Unsplash.com

If you want to freeze the action, increase your shutter speed. Of course, you’ll need to up your ISO or open the aperture a bit to compensate. Or to help communicate the windiness, slow your shutter speed down a bit. Just be sure the things in the shot that are supposed to be stable stay sharp: mountains, buildings, etc.

Stabilize your gear

If your camera has image stabilization, turn it on, even on a tripod. Typically that’s a bad idea, but it can make a positive difference on a windy day. If it’s really windy and your tripod may tip over, steady the legs with something heavy or hang something from the bottom. That’s what the hook is for. But don’t use something that could double as a sail. It may contribute to the problem. And keep your center column unextended. Even lowering the overall height of the tripod can help.

Work the wind

smooth like glass water

Photo by Oldskool Photography from Unsplash.com

Add a neutral density filter to your lens to limit the amount of light entering your camera. This allows for longer shutter speeds in daylight to make water appear smooth and clouds seem extra wispy.

Add a dash of flash

If you want to create a frozen moment but still communicate motion, try using your flash. Just a quick pop of extra light will freeze part of the action, but keep the shutter open long enough.

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